Conductive Carbon Nanotube Composite Microprobes

Authors

  • O. Yaglioglu,

    1. Precision Engineering Research Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • R. Martens,

    1. Precision Engineering Research Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • A. J. Hart,

    1. Precision Engineering Research Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • A. H. Slocum

    1. Precision Engineering Research Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • This work was funded in part by an NSF Grant (No. DMI-0521985) and in part by an Ignition Grant from the MIT Deshpande Center for Technological Innovation. A. J. Hart is grateful for a Fannie and John Hertz Foundation Fellowship. We are also thankful to Prof. Y. M. Chiang for sharing his laboratory facilities for our nanotube growth experiments, to Prof. B. Wardle for his comments, and to Manu Prakash for his assistance with laser cutting.

Abstract

original image

A simple, flexible, and robust way of fabricating fully functional electromechanical carbon nanotube (CNT) microprobes, by transferring as-grown CNT columns onto a conductive substrate using a conductive epoxy (see figure), is shown. The CNT microprobes are approximately 500 times stronger than as-grown pillars and can perform up to 200 cycles without degradation in electrical or mechanical properties.

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