Advanced Materials

A Novel Anti-inflammatory Surface for Neural Electrodes

Authors

  • W. He,

    1. Neurological Biomaterials and Therapeutics, Laboratory for Neuroengineering, Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology/Emory University, 313 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
    2. Present address: Departments of Materials Science and Engineering, and Mechanical, Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
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  • G. C. McConnell,

    1. Neurological Biomaterials and Therapeutics, Laboratory for Neuroengineering, Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology/Emory University, 313 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
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  • T. M. Schneider,

    1. Neurological Biomaterials and Therapeutics, Laboratory for Neuroengineering, Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology/Emory University, 313 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
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  • R. V. Bellamkonda

    1. Neurological Biomaterials and Therapeutics, Laboratory for Neuroengineering, Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology/Emory University, 313 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
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  • The authors thank the National Institute of Health (R01 NS045072) for support of this study. T.M.S. thanks the Undergraduate Research Scholars program from Georgia Tech/Emory Center for the Engineering of Living Tissues (funded by the National Science Foundation).

Abstract

An inherently anti-inflammatory surface for neural electrodes is fabricated by immobilization of a neuroimmunomodulatory peptide alpha-MSH. In vitro cell studies and in vivo rodent studies demonstrate that the tethered peptide retains its anti-inflammatory properties, and is able to directly modulate microglial response by modulating the expression of inflammatory cytokine (see figure), thereby suggesting the potential of this strategy to improve the reliability of chronic neural implants in vivo.

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