Get access
Advertisement

Printed Graphene Circuits

Authors

  • J.-H. Chen,

    1. Physics Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    2. Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • M. Ishigami,

    1. Physics Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • C. Jang,

    1. Physics Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    2. Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    3. Center for Superconductivity Research, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • D. R. Hines,

    1. Physics Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    2. Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • M. S. Fuhrer,

    1. Physics Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    2. Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    3. Center for Superconductivity Research, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author
  • E. D. Williams

    1. Physics Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    2. Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    3. Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    4. Laboratory for Physical Sciences, College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    Search for more papers by this author

  • This work has been supported by the Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Fellowship program, the Laboratory for Physical Sciences, the U.S. Office of Naval Research grant no. N000140610882, and NSF grant no. CCF-06-34321. The UMD-MRSEC Shared Equipment Facilities were used in this research.

Abstract

original image

Flexible and transparent electronic devices with extremely high mobilities are fabricated from a graphene sheet, a single atomic layer of graphite, by using the transfer printing method. “Printed” graphene circuits achieve field effect mobilities of up to 10000 cm2/Vs at room temperature. Our printing technique is scaleable and a more chemically-gentle process for fabricating high quality graphene, and nanoscale devices in general.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary