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Sol-Gel Inks for Direct-Write Assembly of Functional Oxides

Authors

  • E. B. Duoss,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
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  • M. Twardowski,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
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  • J. A. Lewis

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
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  • This material is based on work supported by the U. S. Army Research Office under contract/grant number DAAD19-03-1-0227. Partial support was also provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Materials Sciences, under Award No. DEFG-02-91ER45439, through the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, for measurements obtained in the Center for Microanalysis of Materials, University of Illinois. We thank G. Gratson, M. Xu, S. Rhodes, W. Wu, J. Carroll, III, T. Malkowski, F. García-Santamaría, and P. Braun for useful discussions. Supporting Information is available online from Wiley InterScience or from the authors.

Abstract

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Sol-gel inks have been developed for direct-write assembly of functional oxide structures with sub-micron features. Highly uniform, planar and 3D micro-periodic structures (see figure) have been patterned that can be readily converted to titania upon calcination.

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