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Inkjet Printing of Narrow Conductive Tracks on Untreated Polymeric Substrates

Authors

  • T. H. J. van Osch,

    1. Laboratory of Macromolecular Chemistry and Nanoscience, Eindhoven University of Technology and, Dutch Polymer Institute (DPI), PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (The Netherlands)
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  • J. Perelaer,

    1. Laboratory of Macromolecular Chemistry and Nanoscience, Eindhoven University of Technology and, Dutch Polymer Institute (DPI), PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (The Netherlands)
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  • A. W. M. de Laat,

    1. Philips Applied Technologies, High Tech Campus 7-3A-022-3, 5656 AE Eindhoven (The Netherlands)
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  • U. S. Schubert

    1. Laboratory of Macromolecular Chemistry and Nanoscience, Eindhoven University of Technology and, Dutch Polymer Institute (DPI), PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (The Netherlands)
    2. Laboratory of Organic and Macromolecular Chemistry, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Humboldtstr. 10, 07743 Jena (Germany)
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  • The research of J.P. forms part of the research program (#546) of the Dutch Polymer Institute (DPI). We would like to thank Chris Hendriks for his contribution, Martin Schoepler (Dimatix–Fujifilm) for providing us the one picoliter cartridges, and the Dutch Polymer Institute for financial support.

Abstract

Small conductive tracks are created by direct inkjet-printing of an ink with 30 nm silver particles onto flexible and transparent untreated polyarylate foils with a low surface energy. Lines with a diameter as narrow as 40 micrometers are obtained. After sintering, the conductivity of the obtained silver tracks is 13 to 23 % that of bulk silver. Such direct inkjet-printing may be applied in plastic electronics, where prestructuring or pretreatment of the substrate should be avoided to reduce production costs.

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