Advanced Materials

Developments in Nanostructured Cathode Materials for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries

Authors

  • Ying Wang,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195 (USA)
    2. Current address: Materials Research Institute and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Current address: Materials Research Institute and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA.
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  • Guozhong Cao

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195 (USA)
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195 (USA).
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  • This work has been supported in part by the National Science Foundation (DMI-0455994) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR-MURI, FA9550-06-1-032). This work has also been supported by the Center for Nanotechnology at UW, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL), the Joint Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (JIN, UW, and PNNL), Washington Technology Center (WTC), and JFE Steel Corporation, Japan. Y.W. would like to acknowledge Ford, Nanotechnology, and JIN graduate fellowships. A portion of the research (TEM study) described in this paper was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at PNNL.

Abstract

Nanostructured materials lie at the heart of fundamental advances in efficient energy storage and/or conversion, in which surface processes and transport kinetics play determining roles. This Review describes some recent developments in the synthesis and characterization of nanostructured cathode materials, including lithium transition metal oxides, vanadium oxides, manganese oxides, lithium phosphates, and various nanostructured composites. The major goal of this Review is to highlight some new progress in using these nanostructured materials as cathodes to develop lithium batteries with high energy density, high rate capability, and excellent cycling stability resulting from their huge surface area, short distance for mass and charge transport, and freedom for volume change in nanostructured materials.

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