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Reversible and Amplified Fluorescence Quenching of a Photochromic Polythiophene

Authors

  • Jeremy Finden,

    1. Department of Chemistry Simon Fraser University 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6 (Canada)
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  • Tamara K. Kunz,

    1. Department of Chemistry University of British Columbia 2036 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)
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  • Neil R. Branda,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry Simon Fraser University 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6 (Canada)
    • Department of Chemistry Simon Fraser University 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6 (Canada).
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  • Michael O. Wolf

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry University of British Columbia 2036 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)
    • Department of Chemistry University of British Columbia 2036 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada).
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  • This work was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (AGENO), the Canada Research Chairs Program, Simon Fraser University and the University of British Columbia. We are grateful to Nippon Zeon Corporation for supplying the octafluorocyclopentene needed to prepare the photochromic compounds and to Prof. Stephen Holdcroft (SFU) for help with measuring the quantum yields. Supporting Information is available online from Wiley InterScience or from the authors.

Abstract

Amplification of fluorescence quenching of a polythiophene is optically triggered by converting pendant dithienylethene (DTE) photoswitches to their ring- closed isomers using UV light. The effect can be reversed with visible light, which regenerates the original DTE isomer. Amplification attributed to the high mobility of electronic excited states in conjugated polymers, which facilitates energy transfer to a ring-closed DTE.

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