Enhancement of In Vitro Capillary Tube Formation by Substrate Nanotopography

Authors

  • C. J. Bettinger,

    1. Biomedical Engineering Center, Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, 555 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
    2. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room E25-342, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • Z. Zhang,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room E25-342, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • S. Gerecht,

    1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Maryland Hall 216, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (USA)
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  • J. T. Borenstein,

    1. Biomedical Engineering Center, Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, 555 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • R. Langer

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room E25-342, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • The authors would like to acknowledge the following: Dr. Eliza Vasile from the Center for Cancer Research, Microscopy and Imaging Core Facility at MIT for assistance with imaging, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (fellowship to S.G.), the MEMS Technology Group at the Draper Laboratory for direct funding for C.J.B. and use of facilities; funding provided through DL-H-550154; NIH grants R01-DE-013023-06, P41 EB002520-01A1 and 1R01HL076485-01A2. The content of this paper does not necessarily reflect the position or the policy of the government, and no official endorsement should be inferred. Supporting Information is available online from Wiley InterScience or from the authors.

Abstract

original image

Endothelial progenitor cells are cultured on nanotopographic substrates with a line-grating geometry and respond to these substrates through aligned and elongated morphology, reduced proliferation, and increased migration relative to flat substrates. The cells also form supercellular band structures, which lead to enhanced capillary tube formation upon the addition of matrigel. These results suggest that substrate nanotopography can be used to create organized vascular structures in vitro. Image taken at 250 × magnification.

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