Cover Picture: Weaving Genetically Engineered Functionality into Mechanically Robust Virus Fibers (Adv. Mater. 6/2007)

Authors

  • C.-Y. Chiang,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Division of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 16-244, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
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  • C. M. Mello,

    1. Macromolecular Science Team, U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, Natick Solider Center, Kansas St., Natick, MA 01760, USA
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  • J. Gu,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Division of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 16-244, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
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  • E. C. C. M. Silva,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 8-237, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
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  • K. J. Van Vliet,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 8-237, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
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  • A. M. Belcher

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Division of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 16-244, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
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Abstract

The desired functionality of a virus fiber (such as gold-binding ability) can be programmed by manipulating the M13 virus genome, report Angela Belcher, Krystyn Van Vliet, and co-workers on p. 826. The background picture is an illustration of a virus fiber that is conjugated with cadmium selenide quantum dots and emits red light when excited by UV irradiation. The genetically tunable functionality on the virus fiber offers a convenient designing process and will bring a variety of new applications to antimicrobial, catalytic, optical, medical, and electronic fibers.

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