Chains of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles

Authors

  • Kazuya Nakata,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • Ying Hu,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • Oktay Uzun,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • Osman Bakr,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • Francesco Stellacci

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA).
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  • The authors thank Dr. Xiaogang Liu for insights in the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles. K. N. acknowledges the kind support of Research Fellowships of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science for Young Scientists. F. S. is grateful for the generous support of the Packard Foundation award, the NSF CAREER award, and the Singapore MIT Alliance. Supporting Information is available online from Wiley InterScience or from the author.

Abstract

original image

Molecularly linked γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles chains are produced from superparamagnetic γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles under zero applied magnetic field. The chains exhibit ferromagnetic interaction between γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles that compose them as evidenced by an increase in blocking temperature from ∼80 K in the case of isolated nanoparticles to ∼120 K for chains.

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