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Photoluminescent Nanoparticle Surfaces: The Potential of Alkaline Earth Oxides for Optical Applications

Authors

  • Andreas Sternig,

    1. Institute of Materials Chemistry Vienna University of Technology Veterinärplatz 1/GA 1210 Vienna (Austria)
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  • Slavica Stankic,

    1. Institute of Materials Chemistry Vienna University of Technology Veterinärplatz 1/GA 1210 Vienna (Austria)
    2. Institut des Nanosciences de Paris Campus de Boucicaut 140 Rue de Lourmel 75015 Paris (France)
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  • Markus Müller,

    1. Institute of Materials Chemistry Vienna University of Technology Veterinärplatz 1/GA 1210 Vienna (Austria)
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  • Johannes Bernardi,

    1. University Service Centre for Transmission Electron Microscopy Vienna University of Technology Wiedener Hauptstrasse 8–10/052 1040 Vienna (Austria)
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  • Erich Knözinger,

    1. Institute of Materials Chemistry Vienna University of Technology Veterinärplatz 1/GA 1210 Vienna (Austria)
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  • Oliver Diwald

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Materials Chemistry Vienna University of Technology Veterinärplatz 1/GA 1210 Vienna (Austria)
    • Institute of Materials Chemistry Vienna University of Technology Veterinärplatz 1/GA 1210 Vienna (Austria).
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  • This project has been financially supported by Fonds zur Förderung der Wissenschaftlichen Forschung (FWF) P 17770-N11/ P19848-N20, which is gratefully acknowledged. A. Sternig, S. Stankic, and M. Müller contributed equally to this work. Supporting Information is available online from Wiley InterScience or from the authors.

Abstract

The surfaces of alkaline earth oxides emit bright, colored light and have potential as thermally stable inorganic phosphors with adsorption-dependent optical properties. The doping of thermally stable MgO nanocubes with low-coordinated BaO surface elements (see figure) clearly demonstrates that chemical manipulation of the solid–gas interface provides an efficient means to adjust the optical properties of powders in controlled gas atmospheres.

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