Exploiting Ionic Coupling in Electronic Devices: Electrolyte-Gated Organic Field-Effect Transistors

Authors

  • Matthew J. Panzer,

    1. Laboratory of Organic Optics and Electronics, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • C. Daniel Frisbie

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (USA)
    • Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (USA).
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  • C.D.F. acknowledges support of this research by the NSF MRSEC program (DMR-0212302).

Abstract

Currently there is great interest in using organic semiconductors to develop novel flexible electronic applications. An emerging strategy in organic semiconductor materials research involves development of composite or layered materials in which electronic and ionic conductivity is combined to create enhanced functionality in devices. For example, we and other groups have employed ionic motion to modulate electronic transport in organic field-effect transistors using solid electrolytes. Not only do these transistors operate at low voltages as a result of greatly enhanced capacitive coupling, but they also display intriguing transport phenomena such as negative differential transconductance. Here, we discuss differences in operation between traditional (e.g., SiO2) and electrolyte-based dielectrics, suggest further improvements to currently used electrolyte materials, and propose several possibilities for exploiting electrolytes in future applications with both organic and inorganic semiconductors.

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