Organic Solar Cells Using Nanoimprinted Transparent Metal Electrodes

Authors

  • Myung-Gyu Kang,

    1. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Michigan 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, MI48109 (USA)
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  • Myung-Su Kim,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Macromolecular Science and Engineering, The University of Michigan 2300 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA)
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  • Jinsang Kim,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Macromolecular Science and Engineering, The University of Michigan 2300 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA)
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  • L. Jay Guo

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Michigan 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, MI48109 (USA)
    • Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Michigan 1301 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, MI48109 (USA).
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Organic Solar Cells Using Nanoimprinted Transparent Metal Electrode Volume 20, Issue 24, Article first published online: 16 December 2008

  • This work was supported in part by NSF and KACST. The authors thank Prof. Max Shtein for allowing us to use the metal evaporator for organic solar cell fabrication.

Abstract

original image

Transparent metal electrodes fabricated by nanoimprint lithography show high optical transmittance as well as good electrical conductivity. Organic solar cells prepared using these transparent metal electrodes demonstrate an equal performance to those prepared with conventional ITO electrodes.

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