Advanced Materials

Stop-Flow Lithography of Colloidal, Glass, and Silicon Microcomponents

Authors

  • Robert F. Shepherd,

    1. Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, U-C 1304 W Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
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  • Priyadarshi Panda,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • Zhihao Bao,

    1. School of Material Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
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  • Kenneth H. Sandhage,

    1. School of Material Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology 771 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332 (USA)
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  • T. Alan Hatton,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • Jennifer A. Lewis,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, U-C 1304 W Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
    • Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, U-C 1304 W Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (USA).
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  • Patrick S. Doyle

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Material Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, U-C 1304 W Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
    • Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA).
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  • R. F. S and P. P contributed equally to this work. J. A. L., P. S. D., and K. H. S. designed the research; R. F. S., P. P., and Z. B. performed the research, R. F. S., P. P., J. A. L., and P. S. D. wrote the paper. This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation (DMR-0652424, CTS-0120978 and CTS-0304128) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-05-1-0092). The authors thank A. Deconinck for software development, K. Erickson, S. M. Menke, A. Cote, and A. Balducci for useful discussions, and M. McConney and S. MacLaren for assistance with AFM.

Abstract

Stop-flow lithography (SFL) is used for patterning colloidal building blocks into controlled structures (gears and other shapes) at rates that exceed 103 min−1 using an index-matched system composed of silica microspheres suspended in a photocurable acrylamide solution as shown in the figure. These structures are dried and then transformed, in batch, at elevated temperatures into microcomponents composed of porous or glassy silicon oxide or porous silicon via magnesiothermic reduction.

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