Up- and Down-Conversion Cubic Zirconia and Hafnia Nanobelts

Authors

  • Changlong Jiang,

    1. Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)
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  • Feng Wang,

    1. Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)
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  • Nianqiang Wu,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering West Virginia University, Morganton, WV 36506 (USA)
    • Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering West Virginia University, Morganton, WV 36506 (USA).
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  • Xiaogang Liu

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 (Singapore)
    • Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore 3 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117543 (Singapore).
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  • This study was supported by NUS Academic Research Fund (grant nos. R-143-000-317 and R-143-000-342) and a Young Investigator Award (grant no. R-143-000-318) to X. L. by NUS. N. W. acknowledges the partial financial support of WVNano Nanoscience Initiative Fund through the West Virginia University Research Corporation. X. L. is grateful to Y. Han for helpful discussions. Supporting Information is available online from Wiley InterScience or from the author.

Abstract

original image

Single-crystalline, cubic ZrO2- and HfO2 nanobelts have been fabricated via a direct thermal-decomposition process under atmospheric pressure. The formation of cubic nanobelts can be controlled by varying the dopant concentration of nanobelt precursors, heating temperatures, and heating rates. The lanthanide-doped nanobelts show a dual capability for both down- and up-conversion emissions (see picture) in the visible range.

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