Advanced Materials

Nanotopographic Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Substrate Freezes Lateral Motion of Secretory Vesicles

Authors

  • Jing Zhang,

    1. School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering Nanyang Technological University 70 Nanyang Drive, 637 457 (Singapore)
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  • Dongliang Fu,

    1. School of Materials Science and Engineering Nan yang Technological University 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639 798 (Singapore)
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  • Mary B. Chan-Park,

    1. School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering Nanyang Technological University 70 Nanyang Drive, 637 457 (Singapore)
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  • Lain-Jong Li,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Materials Science and Engineering Nan yang Technological University 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639 798 (Singapore)
    • School of Materials Science and Engineering Nan yang Technological University 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639 798 (Singapore).
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  • Peng Chen

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering Nanyang Technological University 70 Nanyang Drive, 637 457 (Singapore)
    • School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering Nanyang Technological University 70 Nanyang Drive, 637 457 (Singapore).
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Abstract

Thin-film carbon-nanotube networks can interface with living neuroendocrine PC12 cells and support their growth and proliferation. Interestingly, as revealed by total-internal-reflection fluorescence microscopy, the nanoroughness created by the carbon-nanotube net physically deforms the 5 nm thick cell membrane with high local curvature, and significantly impedes the lateral motion of subplasmalemmal secretory vesicles.

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