Stretchable Electronics: Materials Strategies and Devices

Authors

  • Dae-Hyeong Kim,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois 61801 (USA)
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  • John A. Rogers

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois 61801 (USA)
    2. Departments of Chemistry, Mechanical Science and Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois 61801 (USA)
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois 61801 (USA).
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  • This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant DMI-0328162 and the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Materials Sciences under Award No. DE-FG02- 07ER46471, through the Materials Research Laboratory and Center for Microanalysis of Materials (DE-FG02-07ER46453) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Abstract

New electronic materials have the potential to enable wearable computers, personal health monitors, wall-scale displays and other systems that are not easily achieved with established wafer based technologies. A traditional focus of this field is on the development of materials for circuits that can be formed on bendable substrates, such as sheets of plastic or steel foil. More recent efforts seek to achieve similar systems on fully elastic substrates for electronics that can be stretched, compressed, twisted and deformed in ways that are much more extreme than simple bending. This article highlights some recent progress in this area, with an emphasis on materials approaches and demonstrated devices.

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