Materials Science in the Developing World: Challenges and Perspectives for Africa

Authors

  • Federico Rosei,

    Corresponding author
    1. Canada Research Chair in Nanostructured Organic and Inorganic Materials Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Energie, Matériaux et Télécommunications Université du Québec 1650 Boul. Lionel-Boulet, J3X 1S2 Varennes, QC (Canada)
    • Canada Research Chair in Nanostructured Organic and Inorganic Materials Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Energie, Matériaux et Télécommunications Université du Québec 1650 Boul. Lionel-Boulet, J3X 1S2 Varennes, QC (Canada).
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  • Lionel Vayssieres,

    Corresponding author
    1. World Premier International Center for Materials NanoArchitectonics National Institute for Materials Science Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0044 (Japan)
    • World Premier International Center for Materials NanoArchitectonics National Institute for Materials Science Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0044 (Japan).
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  • Patrick Mensah

    Corresponding author
    1. Formosa Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering Southern University and A&M College Baton Rouge, LA 70813 (USA)
    • Formosa Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering Southern University and A&M College Baton Rouge, LA 70813 (USA).
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  • F. R. acknowledges the Canada Research Chairs program for partial salary support. The authors' participation in MRS Africa 2007 was funded by the International Center for Materials Research (UCSB) and the International Centers for Young Scientists and for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science, Japan (L.V.), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Canada Research Chairs program (F.R.) and the National Science Foundation (P.F.M.). We are grateful to F. Stellacci, A. Tavares, T.W. Johnston, C. Santato, S. Minsky, R. and S. Rosei for critical readings of the manuscript and M. Arella and M. Chaker for helpful discussions.

Abstract

“Africans believe in something that is difficult to render in English. We call it ubuntu or botho. It means the essence of being human. You know when it is there and when it is absent. It speaks about humanness, gentleness, hospitality, putting yourself out on behalf of others, being vulnerable. It embraces compassion and roughness. It recognizes that my humanity is bound up in yours, for we can only be human together” (Desmond Tutu)

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