Stacking the Nanochemistry Deck: Structural and Compositional Diversity in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

Authors

  • Leonardo D. Bonifacio,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto 80, St George St., Toronto ON M5S 3H6 (Canada)
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  • Bettina V. Lotsch,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto 80, St George St., Toronto ON M5S 3H6 (Canada)
    2. Department Chemie und Biochemie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München Butenandtstr. 5-13 (Haus D), 81377 München (Germany)
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  • Daniel P. Puzzo,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto 80, St George St., Toronto ON M5S 3H6 (Canada)
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  • Francesco Scotognella,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto 80, St George St., Toronto ON M5S 3H6 (Canada)
    2. Department of Materials Science, University of Milan Bicocca Via R. Cozzi, 55, I-20125 Milan (Italy)
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  • Geoffrey A. Ozin

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto 80, St George St., Toronto ON M5S 3H6 (Canada)
    • Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto 80, St George St., Toronto ON M5S 3H6 (Canada).
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Abstract

One-dimensional photonic structures, known as Bragg stacks or Bragg reflectors or Bragg mirrors, represent a well-developed subject in the field of optical science. However, because of a lack of dynamic tunability and their dependence on complex top-down techniques for their fabrication, they have received little attention from the materials science community. Herein, we present recent and ongoing developments on the way to functional one-dimensional photonic structures obtained from simple bottom-up techniques. We focus on the versatility of this new approach, which allows the incorporation of a wide range of materials into photonic structures.

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