Degradable, Surfactant-Free, Monodisperse Polymer-Encapsulated Emulsions as Anticancer Drug Carriers

Authors

  • Sri Sivakumar,

    1. Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering The University of Melbourne Victoria 3010 (Australia)
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  • Vipul Bansal,

    1. Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering The University of Melbourne Victoria 3010 (Australia)
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  • Christina Cortez,

    1. Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering The University of Melbourne Victoria 3010 (Australia)
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  • Siow-Feng Chong,

    1. Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering The University of Melbourne Victoria 3010 (Australia)
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  • Alexander N. Zelikin,

    1. Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering The University of Melbourne Victoria 3010 (Australia)
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  • Frank Caruso

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering The University of Melbourne Victoria 3010 (Australia)
    • Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering The University of Melbourne Victoria 3010 (Australia).
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Abstract

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Anticancer emulsions: Degradable, surfactant- free, micrometer- to sub-micrometer-sized polymer-encapsulated emulsions loaded with lipophilic drugs (doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil) are prepared. In vitro drug-release studies demonstrate controlled release under redox conditions and incubation with human colorectal cancer cells triggers cell death with greater efficiency (≈106 fold) than the free drug.

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