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Reagentless Protein Assembly Triggered by Localized Electrical Signals

Authors

  • Xiao-Wen Shi,

    1. Center for Biosystems Research University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute 5115 Plant Sciences Building College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
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  • Xiaohua Yang,

    1. Center for Biosystems Research University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute 5115 Plant Sciences Building College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
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  • Karen J. Gaskell,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
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  • Yi Liu,

    1. Center for Biosystems Research University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute 5115 Plant Sciences Building College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
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  • Eiry Kobatake,

    1. Department of Biological Information Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology Tokyo Institute of Technology 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan)
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  • William E. Bentley,

    1. Center for Biosystems Research University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute 5115 Plant Sciences Building College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    2. Fischell Department of Bioengineering University of Maryland at College Park College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
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  • Gregory F. Payne

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Biosystems Research University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute 5115 Plant Sciences Building College Park, MD 20742 (USA)
    • Center for Biosystems Research University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute 5115 Plant Sciences Building College Park, MD 20742 (USA).
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Abstract

Electrode-imposed signals are used to assemble proteins without the need for reactive reagents. The two-step assembly approach uses i) cathodic signals to electrodeposit the amino-polysaccharide chitosan and ii) anodic signals to activate the chitosan film for protein assembly. Proteins are shown to assemble at individual electrode addresses, with spatial selectivity and quantitative control.

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