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Mapping the Interactions among Biomaterials, Adsorbed Proteins, and Human Embryonic Stem Cells

Authors

  • Ying Mei,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • Sharon Gerecht,

    1. Department of Chemical and Bimolecular Engineering Johns Hopkins University Baltimore, MD 21218 (USA)
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  • Michael Taylor,

    1. Laboratory of Biophysics and Surface Analysis School of Pharmacy The University of Nottingham Nottingham, NG7 2RD (UK)
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  • Andrew J. Urquhart,

    1. Laboratory of Biophysics and Surface Analysis School of Pharmacy The University of Nottingham Nottingham, NG7 2RD (UK)
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  • Said R. Bogatyrev,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • Seung-Woo Cho,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • Martyn C. Davies,

    1. Laboratory of Biophysics and Surface Analysis School of Pharmacy The University of Nottingham Nottingham, NG7 2RD (UK)
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  • Morgan R. Alexander,

    1. Laboratory of Biophysics and Surface Analysis School of Pharmacy The University of Nottingham Nottingham, NG7 2RD (UK)
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  • Robert S. Langer,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • Daniel G. Anderson

    Corresponding author
    1. David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research Massachusetts Institute of Technology 45 Carleton Street, Building E25-342 Cambridge, MA 02142 (USA)
    • David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research Massachusetts Institute of Technology 45 Carleton Street, Building E25-342 Cambridge, MA 02142 (USA).
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Abstract

An integrated high-throughput polymer synthesis and rapid material/protein/cell interaction assays were developed to optimize stem cell microenvironments. Microarrayed polymers were synthesized and studied for the ability to support the growth of partially differentiated human embryonic stem cells. In parallel, a programmed laser scanning cytometry system was developed to allow for rapid quantification of cell material interaction.

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