Electrosynthesized Surface-Imprinted Conducting Polymer Microrods for Selective Protein Recognition

Authors

  • Anna Menaker,

    1. Department of Materials Science Tallinn University of Technology Ehitajate tee 5, Tallinn 19086 (Estonia)
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  • Vitali Syritski,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science Tallinn University of Technology Ehitajate tee 5, Tallinn 19086 (Estonia)
    • Department of Materials Science Tallinn University of Technology Ehitajate tee 5, Tallinn 19086 (Estonia).
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  • Jekaterina Reut,

    1. Department of Materials Science Tallinn University of Technology Ehitajate tee 5, Tallinn 19086 (Estonia)
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  • Andres Öpik,

    1. Department of Materials Science Tallinn University of Technology Ehitajate tee 5, Tallinn 19086 (Estonia)
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  • Viola Horváth,

    1. Hungarian Academy of Sciences Budapest University of Technology and Economics Research Group for Technical Analytical Chemistry Szt. Gellért tér 4, Budapest 1111 (Hungary)
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  • Róbert E. Gyurcsányi

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry Budapest University of Technology and Economics Szt. Gellért tér 4, Budapest 1111 (Hungary)
    2. Hungarian Academy of Sciences Budapest University of Technology and Economics Research Group for Technical Analytical Chemistry Szt. Gellért tér 4, Budapest 1111 (Hungary)
    • Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry Budapest University of Technology and Economics Szt. Gellért tér 4, Budapest 1111 (Hungary).
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Abstract

original image

Novel surface-imprinted conducting polymer microrods are shown to selectively recognize the template protein, as demonstrated by competitive binding assays using fluorescence detection. The electrochemical template synthesis provides means for controlled fabrication and spatial confinement of the PEDOT/PSS polymer proposed in this work, which exhibits extraordinary low nonspecific interactions and is effectively turned into a selective protein sorbent upon imprinting.

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