Cover Picture: Biomolecular Motor-Powered Self-Assembly of Dissipative Nanocomposite Rings (Adv. Mater. 23/2008)

Authors

  • Haiqing Liu,

    1. Biomolecular Interfaces and Systems Department, Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS-1413, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (USA)
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  • Erik D. Spoerke,

    1. Electronic and Nanostructured Materials Department, Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS-1411, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (USA)
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  • Marlene Bachand,

    1. Biomolecular Interfaces and Systems Department, Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS-1413, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (USA)
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  • Steven J. Koch,

    1. Biomolecular Interfaces and Systems Department, Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS-1413, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (USA)
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  • Bruce C. Bunker,

    1. Electronic and Nanostructured Materials Department, Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS-1411, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (USA)
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  • George D. Bachand

    Corresponding author
    1. Biomolecular Interfaces and Systems Department, Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS-1413, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (USA)
    • Biomolecular Interfaces and Systems Department, Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS-1413, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (USA).
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Abstract

original image

Kinesin biomolecular motors can be used to transport a range of metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles. On page 4476, George Bachand and co-workers report the self-assembly of nonequilibrium nanocomposites consisting of microtubule filaments and nanocrystal quantum dots. The cyclic assembly and disassembly of these composites are driven by the dynamic interaction of energy-dissipative (biomolecular transport) and thermodynamic processes (noncovalent bond formation).

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