Advanced Materials

Interfacing Conducting Polymer Nanotubes with the Central Nervous System: Chronic Neural Recording using Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) Nanotubes

Authors

  • Mohammad Reza Abidian,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Michigan 1101 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA)
    • Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Michigan 1101 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA).
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  • Kip A. Ludwig,

    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA)
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  • Timothy C. Marzullo,

    1. Neuroscience Program, The University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA)
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  • David C. Martin,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Macromolecular Science and Engineering, and Biomedical Engineering Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA)
    2. Present Address: Karl W. Böer Professor and Chair, Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Delaware, 201C DuPont Hall, Newark, DE, 19716 (USA)
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  • Daryl R. Kipke

    1. Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Michigan 1101 Beal Ave., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (USA)
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Abstract

Microelectrodes implanted in the brain are increasingly being used to treat neurological disorders. However, robust and reliable chronic application of neural electrodes remains a challenge. Here, we report, the use of conducting polymer nanotubes as highly selective neural interfaces for chronic neural recordings. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) nanotubes were formed on the chronic neural microelectrode. The quality of neuronal spike recordings was significantly improved relative to metal electrode sites.

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