Connecting Organic Nanowires

Authors

  • Ana Borras,

    Corresponding author
    1. Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research “nanotech@surfaces” Laboratory Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, Thun, 3602 (Switzerland)
    • Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research “nanotech@surfaces” Laboratory Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, Thun, 3602 (Switzerland).
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  • Oliver Gröning,

    1. Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research “nanotech@surfaces” Laboratory Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, Thun, 3602 (Switzerland)
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  • Jürgen Köble,

    1. Omicron Nanotechnology GmbH Limburger Strasse 75, Taunusstein-Neuhof, 65232 (Germany)
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  • Pierangelo Gröning

    1. Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research “nanotech@surfaces” Laboratory Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, Thun, 3602 (Switzerland)
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Abstract

original image

A unique methodology for connecting organic nanowires is presented. Metal nanoparticles deposited along the primary organic nanowires act as both nucleation sites and Ohmic connections for the secondary nanowires. These nanowires are formed by self-assembly of π-conjugated molecules and large charge mobility is expected along the nanowires axis.

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