Advanced Materials

Synthetic pH-Responsive Polymers for Protein Transduction

Authors

  • William B. Liechty,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (UK)
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  • Rongjun Chen,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (UK)
    • Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (UK).
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  • Farzin Farzaneh,

    1. Department of Molecular Medicine Guy's, King's and St Thomas's School of Medicine, King's Denmark Hill Campus Rayne Institute, 123 Coldharbour Lane London SE5 9NU (UK)
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  • Mahvash Tavassoli,

    1. Department of Molecular Medicine Guy's, King's and St Thomas's School of Medicine, King's Denmark Hill Campus Rayne Institute, 123 Coldharbour Lane London SE5 9NU (UK)
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  • Nigel K. H. Slater

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (UK)
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Abstract

A pH-responsive, endosomal membrane disruptive, metabolite-derived polyamide PP-75 is developed to deliver the MBP-Apoptin fusion protein, which induces tumor-specific apoptosis into human osteogenic sarcoma Saos-2 cells. The intracellular distribution and colocalization of MBP-Apoptin-AF647 (MA-AF649) and PP-75-FITC provide strong evidence that PP-75 both enhances uptake and facilitates cytoplasmic release of MBP-Apoptin.

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