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Nanoparticle-Dispersed Liquid Crystals Fabricated by Sputter Doping

Authors

  • Hiroyuki Yoshida,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)
    • Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan).
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  • Kosuke Kawamoto,

    1. Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)
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  • Hitoshi Kubo,

    1. Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)
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  • Testuya Tsuda,

    1. Frontier Research Base for Flobal Young Researchers Graduate School of Engineering Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)
    2. Department of Applied Chemistry Graduate School of Engineering Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)
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  • Akihiko Fujii,

    1. Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)
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  • Susumu Kuwabata,

    1. Department of Applied Chemistry Graduate School of Engineering Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)
    2. Japan Science and Technology Agency CREST, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0021 (Japan)
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  • Masanori Ozaki

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)
    • Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan).
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Abstract

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A simple and robust method to prepare nanoparticle-dispersed liquid crystals is demonstrated. Highly dispersed gold nanoparticle–liquid crystal suspensions are fabricated by simply sputter doping the gold target on the host liquid crystal (see figure). The existence of the nanoparticles is supported by optical extinction measurements, polarization optical microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. An improvement in the electro-optic response, namely, a decrease in the threshold voltage, is also demonstrated in twist nematic devices fabricated using the nanoparticle-dispersed liquid crystal.

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