Advanced Materials

Cooperative Nanoparticles for Tumor Detection and Photothermally Triggered Drug Delivery

Authors

  • Ji-Ho Park,

    1. Materials Science and Engineering Program Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman, La Jolla, CA 92093 (USA)
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  • Geoffrey von Maltzahn,

    1. Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • Luvena L. Ong,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • Andrea Centrone,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • T. Alan Hatton,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • Erkki Ruoslahti,

    1. Burnham Institute for Medical Research at UCSB University of California, Santa Barbara 1105 Life Sciences Technology Bldg, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (USA)
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  • Sangeeta N. Bhatia,

    1. Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (USA)
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  • Michael J. Sailor

    Corresponding author
    1. Materials Science and Engineering Program Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman, La Jolla, CA 92093 (USA)
    • Materials Science and Engineering Program Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman, La Jolla, CA 92093 (USA)
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Abstract

A cooperative nanosystem consisting of two distinct nanomaterials works in vivo to detect tumor tissues and deliver drugs to the site. Gold nanorods (GNRs) localize to the tumor region, where they report their location and convert near-infrared radiation to thermal energy. Circulating thermally labile therapeutic liposomes respond to the thermal signal, releasing their drug payload selectively in the GNR-populated tumor.

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