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Advanced Materials

Stretchable, Curvilinear Electronics Based on Inorganic Materials

Authors

  • Dae-Hyeong Kim,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois 61801 (USA)
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  • Jianliang Xiao,

    1. Department Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University Evanston, Illinois 60208 (USA)
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  • Jizhou Song,

    1. Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Miami Coral Gables, FL 33146 (USA)
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  • Yonggang Huang,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University Evanston, Illinois 60208 (USA)
    2. Department Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University Evanston, Illinois 60208 (USA)
    • Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University Evanston, Illinois 60208 (USA)
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  • John A. Rogers

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois 61801 (USA)
    2. Department of Chemistry, Mechanical Science and Engineering Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois 61801 (USA)
    3. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois 61801 (USA)
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois 61801 (USA)
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Abstract

All commercial forms of electronic/optoelectronic technologies use planar, rigid substrates. Device possibilities that exploit bio-inspired designs or require intimate integration with the human body demand curvilinear shapes and/or elastic responses to large strain deformations. This article reviews progress in research designed to accomplish these outcomes with established, high-performance inorganic electronic materials and modest modifications to conventional, planar processing techniques. We outline the most well developed strategies and illustrate their use in demonstrator devices that exploit unique combinations of shape, mechanical properties and electronic performance. We conclude with an outlook on the challenges and opportunities for this emerging area of materials science and engineering.

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