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Determination of Electronic Structure of Oxide–Oxide Interfaces by Photoemission Spectroscopy

Authors

  • Hui-Qiong Wang,

    1. Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (USA)
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  • Eric Altman,

    1. Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Department of Chemical Engineering, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (USA)
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  • Christine Broadbridge,

    1. Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Department of Physics, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT 06515 (USA)
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  • Yimei Zhu,

    1. Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (USA)
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  • Victor Henrich

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (USA)
    • Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (USA).
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Abstract

A method has been developed to use the finite escape depth of the photoelectrons emitted in ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) to determine the electronic density-of-states at the interface between two dissimilar metal oxides. Ultrathin films of one oxide are grown heteroepitaxially, one monolayer at a time, on a single-crystal substrate of the other oxide, and UPS spectra are taken after each complete monolayer. By comparing experimental UPS spectra with calculated spectra based on specific models of the interfacial structure, the interfacial density-of-states can be extracted. The two oxide systems studied here are NiO–Fe3O4 and CoO–Fe3O4. The former system is found to have an atomically abrupt interface, with no significant density of interface states. For CoO, however, an interfacial electronic spectrum, different from that of either the substrate or the overlayer, is found. The spatial extent and possible origin of those interfacial states is discussed.

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