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Stretchable, Large-area Organic Electronics

Authors

  • Tsuyoshi Sekitani,

    1. Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering and Information Systems The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)
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  • Takao Someya

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering and Information Systems The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)
    2. Institute for Nano Quantum Information Electronics (INQIE) The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)
    • Institute for Nano Quantum Information Electronics (INQIE) The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan).
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Abstract

Stretchability will significantly expand the application scope of electronics, particularly large-area electronics—displays, sensors, and actuators. If arbitrary surfaces and movable parts could be covered with stretchable electronics, which is impossible with conventional electronics, new classes of applications are expected to emerge. A large hurdle is manufacturing electrical wiring with high conductivity, high stretchability, and large-area compatibility. This Review describes stretchable, large-area electronics based on organic field-effect transistors for applications to sensors and displays. First, novel net-shaped organic transistors are employed to realize stretchable, large-area sensor networks that detect distributions of pressure and temperature simultaneously. The whole system is functional even when it is stretched by 25%. In order to further improve stretchability, printable elastic conductors are developed by dispersing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as dopants uniformly in rubbers. Further, we describe integration of printable elastic conductors with organic transistors to construct a rubber-like stretchable active matrix for large-area sensor and display applications. Finally, we will discuss the future prospects of stretchable, large-area electronics with delineating a picture of the next-generation human/machine interfaces from the aspect of materials science and electronic engineering.

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