Advanced Materials

An Optical “Janus” Device for Integrated Photonics

Authors

  • Thomas Zentgraf,

    1. NSF Nano-scale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC) University of California at Berkeley 3112 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA)
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  • Jason Valentine,

    1. NSF Nano-scale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC) University of California at Berkeley 3112 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA)
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  • Nicholas Tapia,

    1. NSF Nano-scale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC) University of California at Berkeley 3112 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA)
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  • Jensen Li,

    1. NSF Nano-scale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC) University of California at Berkeley 3112 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA)
    2. Department of Physics and Materials Science City University of Hong Kong Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)
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  • Xiang Zhang

    Corresponding author
    1. NSF Nano-scale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC) University of California at Berkeley 3112 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA)
    2. Material Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA)
    • NSF Nano-scale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC) University of California at Berkeley 3112 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA).
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Abstract

Transformation optics provides a new design methodology allowing unprecedented manipulation of light propagation. Traditionally, optical elements only involve stretching or compressing the optical space in one direction whereas the remaining dimensions are unaltered. However, space can be modified in all dimensions simultaneously so that the additional degrees of freedom provided by transformation optics can be used to imprint different elements into a single optical device.

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