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Local Structure of Layered Oxide Electrode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries

Authors

  • J. Bareño,

    1. Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory University of Illinois 104 S. Goodwin Ave. Urbana, IL-61801 (USA)
    2. Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Ave. Argonne, IL-60439 (USA)
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  • C. H. Lei,

    1. Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory University of Illinois 104 S. Goodwin Ave. Urbana, IL-61801 (USA)
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  • J. G. Wen,

    1. Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory University of Illinois 104 S. Goodwin Ave. Urbana, IL-61801 (USA)
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  • S.-H. Kang,

    1. Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Ave. Argonne, IL-60439 (USA)
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  • I. Petrov,

    Corresponding author
    1. Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory University of Illinois 104 S. Goodwin Ave. Urbana, IL-61801 (USA)
    • Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory University of Illinois 104 S. Goodwin Ave. Urbana, IL-61801 (USA).
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  • D. P. Abraham

    Corresponding author
    1. Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Ave. Argonne, IL-60439 (USA)
    • Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Ave. Argonne, IL-60439 (USA).
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Abstract

Li-ion batteries are promising candidates for electrical energy storage in applications ranging from portable electronics to hybrid and electric vehicles. In this context, layered compounds in the Li1+δ(TMxMn1-x)1-δO2 family (TM = transition metal) have received much attention due to their high capacity and stability. In this Research News article we describe recent advances on structural characterization of Li-ion electrode materials using state-of-the-art electron microscopy. Direct evidence of the monoclinic nature of Li2MnO3 has been provided. It has been demonstrated that differences in Z-contrast imaging between Li2MnO3 and LiTMO2 may be used to screen samples for phase separation in the 10–100 nm scale.

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