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Nanoimprint Lithography for Functional Three-Dimensional Patterns

Authors

  • Yuval Ofir,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 0100 (USA)
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  • Isaac W. Moran,

    1. Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 120 Governors Drive, Amherst, MA 01003 (USA)
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  • Chandramouleeswaran Subramani,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 0100 (USA)
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  • Kenneth R. Carter,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 120 Governors Drive, Amherst, MA 01003 (USA)
    • Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 0100 (USA).
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  • Vincent M. Rotello

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 0100 (USA)
    • Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 0100 (USA).
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Abstract

Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is viewed as an alternative nanopatterning technique to traditional photolithography, allowing micrometer-scale and sub-hundred-nanometer resolution as well as three-dimensional structure fabrication. In this Research News article we highlight current activities towards the use of NIL in patterning active or functional materials, and the application of NIL in patterning materials that present both chemistry and structure/topo­graphy in the patterned structures, which provide scaffolds for subsequent manipulation. We discuss and give examples of the various materials and chemistries that have been used to create functional patterns and their implication in various fields as electronic and magnetic devices, optically relevant structures, biologically important surfaces, and 3D particles.

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