Bioinspired Photonic Crystals: Diamond-Structured Titania Photonic-Bandgap Crystals from Biological Templates (Adv. Mater. 1/2010)

Authors

  • Jeremy W. Galusha,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, University of Utah, 315 S 1400 E, Rm 2020, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (USA)
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  • Matthew R. Jorgensen,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, University of Utah, 315 S 1400 E, Rm 2020, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (USA)
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  • Michael H. Bartl

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, University of Utah, 315 S 1400 E, Rm 2020, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (USA)
    • Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, University of Utah, 315 S 1400 E, Rm 2020, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (USA).
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Abstract

original image

The striking coloration of the weevil Lamprocyphus augustus is the result of exoskeleton photonic structures with a diamond-based lattice. Michael Bartl and co-workers report on p. 107 on the development of a sol–gel templating method to convert these unique biopolymeric structures into high-dielectric replicas. Theoretical, structural, and optical studies reveal these bioderived photonic crystals possess a complete bandgap at visible frequencies – the basis for novel optical phenomena based on light localization.

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