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Advanced Materials

New Concepts and Applications in the Macromolecular Chemistry of Fullerenes

Authors

  • Francesco Giacalone,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Organic Chemistry “E. Paternò”, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze s/n, Ed. 17, 90128 Palermo (Italy), Fax: +39-091-566825
    • Department of Organic Chemistry “E. Paternò”, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze s/n, Ed. 17, 90128 Palermo (Italy), Fax: +39-091-566825
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  • Nazario Martín

    Corresponding author
    1. Departamento de Química Orgánica I, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain, IMDEA- Nanociencia, Campus de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)
    • Departamento de Química Orgánica I, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain, IMDEA- Nanociencia, Campus de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain).
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Abstract

A new classification on the different types of fullerene-containing polymers is presented according to their different properties and applications they exhibit in a variety of fields. Because of their interest and novelty, water-soluble and biodegradable C60-polymers are discussed first, followed by polyfullerene-based membranes where unprecedented supramolecular structures are presented. Next are compounds that involve hybrid materials formed from fullerenes and other components such as silica, DNA, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) where the most recent advances have been achieved. A most relevant topic is still that of C60-based donor-acceptor (D–A) polymers. Since their application in photovoltaics D–A polymers are among the most realistic applications of fullerenes in the so-called molecular electronics. The most relevant aspects in these covalently connected fullerene/polymer hybrids as well as new concepts to improve energy conversion efficiencies are presented.

The last topics disccused relate to supramolecular aspects that are in involved in C60-polymer systems and in the self-assembly of C60-macromolecular structures, which open a new scenario for organizing, by means of non-covalent interactions, new supramolecular structures at the nano- and micrometric scale, in which the combination of the hydrofobicity of fullerenes with the versatility of the noncovalent chemistry afford new and spectacular superstructures.

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