Lithium Iron Borates as High-Capacity Battery Electrodes

Authors

  • Atsuo Yamada,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemical System Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Building 5–607, 7–3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113–8656 (Japan)
    • Department of Chemical System Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Building 5–607, 7–3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113–8656 (Japan).
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  • Nobuyuki Iwane,

    1. Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226–8502 (Japan)
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  • Yu Harada,

    1. Department of Electronic Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori, Yokohama 226–8502 (Japan)
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  • Shin-ichi Nishimura,

    1. Department of Chemical System Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Building 5–607, 7–3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113–8656 (Japan)
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  • Yukinori Koyama,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606–8501 (Japan)
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  • Isao Tanaka

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606–8501 (Japan)
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Abstract

original image

Beyond the limited lithium storage capability of the (PO4)3−-based compound, LiFePO4 (170 mAh/g), which is currently recognized as the most promising lithium battery cathode for large-scale application, a compound with the lightest small triangle oxyanion unit (BO3)3−, namely LiFeBO3, exhibits a much larger reversible capacity of ca. 200 mAh/g with surprisingly small volume change of ca. 2%.

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