Advanced Materials

Rylene and Related Diimides for Organic Electronics

Authors

  • Xiaowei Zhan,

    Corresponding author
    1. Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
    • Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
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  • Antonio Facchetti,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Materials Research Center, and Argonne-Northwestern Solar, Energy Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113, USA
    2. Polyera Corporation, Skokie, Illinois 60077, USA
    • Department of Chemistry, Materials Research Center, and Argonne-Northwestern Solar, Energy Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113, USA
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  • Stephen Barlow,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0400, USA
    • School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0400, USA.
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  • Tobin J. Marks,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Materials Research Center, and Argonne-Northwestern Solar, Energy Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113, USA
    • Department of Chemistry, Materials Research Center, and Argonne-Northwestern Solar, Energy Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113, USA
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  • Mark A. Ratner,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Materials Research Center, and Argonne-Northwestern Solar, Energy Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113, USA
    • Department of Chemistry, Materials Research Center, and Argonne-Northwestern Solar, Energy Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113, USA
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  • Michael R. Wasielewski,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Materials Research Center, and Argonne-Northwestern Solar, Energy Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113, USA
    • Department of Chemistry, Materials Research Center, and Argonne-Northwestern Solar, Energy Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113, USA
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  • Seth R. Marder

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0400, USA
    • Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China
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Abstract

Organic electron-transporting materials are essential for the fabrication of organic p-n junctions, photovoltaic cells, n-channel field-effect transistors, and complementary logic circuits. Rylene diimides are a robust, versatile class of polycyclic aromatic electron-transport materials with excellent thermal and oxidative stability, high electron affinities, and, in many cases, high electron mobilities; they are, therefore, promising candidates for a variety of organic electronics applications. In this review, recent developments in the area of high-electron-mobility diimides based on rylenes and related aromatic cores, particularly perylene- and naphthalene-diimide-based small molecules and polymers, for application in high-performance organic field-effect transistors and photovoltaic cells are summarized and analyzed.

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