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Biocompatible Charged and Uncharged Surfaces Using Nanoparticle Films

Authors

  • Chandramouleeswaran Subramani,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003
    Current affiliation:
    1. C. Subramani and A. Bajaj contributed equally to this work.
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  • Avinash Bajaj,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003
    Current affiliation:
    1. C. Subramani and A. Bajaj contributed equally to this work.
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  • Oscar R. Miranda,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003
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  • Vincent M. Rotello

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003
    • Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003.
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Abstract

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Biocompatible surfaces: Cationic, anionic, and neutral nanoparticles (NPs) were immobilized via dithiocarbamate formation onto polyethylenimine (PEI) films to create biofouling resistant surfaces. These surfaces are designed to bind proteins without denaturation, hence preventing biofouling. Extended incubation of these surfaces with BSA and serum demonstrate minimal fouling, providing a new methodology for generating surfaces resistant towards protein fouling.

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