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Zinc Selenide Optical Fibers

Authors

  • Justin R. Sparks,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    2. Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
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  • Rongrui He,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    2. Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
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  • Noel Healy,

    1. Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK
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  • Mahesh Krishnamurthi,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    2. Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
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  • Anna C. Peacock,

    1. Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK
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  • Pier J. A. Sazio,

    1. Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK
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  • Venkatraman Gopalan,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    2. Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
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  • John V. Badding

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    2. Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA
    • Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA.
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Abstract

High purity crystalline ZnSe compound semiconductor waveguides are fabricated inside optical fibers via high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. These fiber waveguides exhibit very low loss (e.g., <1 dB cm−1 at 1550 nm wavelength). The superior optical and electronic properties of crystalline compound semiconductors can now be exploited in a fiber geometry.

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