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Growth of Directly Transferable In2O3 Nanowire Mats for Transparent Thin-film Transistor Applications

Authors

  • Guozhen Shen,

    Corresponding author
    1. Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO) and College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan 430074, China
    • Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO) and College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan 430074, China.
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  • Jing Xu,

    1. Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO) and College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan 430074, China
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  • Xianfu Wang,

    1. Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO) and College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan 430074, China
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  • Hongtao Huang,

    1. Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO) and College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan 430074, China
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  • Di Chen

    1. Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO) and College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan 430074, China
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Abstract

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Peeling off nanowire mats with tweezers? Directly transferable In2O3 nanowire mats are synthesized via a simple laser-ablation chemical vapor deposition method (see figure). The mats are used as active channels to make transparent thin-film transistors with high performance.

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