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Porous Carbon Produced in Air: Physicochemical Properties and Stem Cell Engineering

Authors

  • Won Hyuk Suh,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
    2. Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
    • Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
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  • Jeung Ku Kang,

    1. NanoCentury KI and Graduate School of EEWS (WCU), Department of Materials Science & Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305–701, Korea
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  • Yoo-Hun Suh,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, 28 Yeongeon-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110–799, Korea
    • Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, 28 Yeongeon-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul, 110–799, Korea.
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  • Matthew Tirrell,

    1. Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
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  • Kenneth S. Suslick,

    1. School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, IL 61801, USA
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  • Galen D. Stucky

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
    • Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA
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Abstract

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A novel one-pot in situ templating method of synthesizing micro- and mesoporous carbon (spheres) in oxygenic conditions is reported. The mesoporous carbon has an extremely high surface area (over 1600 m2 g−1). We also introduce, for the first time, lactate as a source of carbon, which is relatively inexpensive and bio-friendly. To achieve this, aerosol-based methods are employed to create a mesoporous and nanostructured carbon-based material with the ultimate goal of influencing human stem cell biology.

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