Selective Metal Transfer and its Application to Patterned Multicolor Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

Authors

  • Dong-Hyun Lee,

    1. School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440–746, Republic of Korea
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  • Hyun-Chul Shin,

    1. School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440–746, Republic of Korea
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  • Heeyeop Chae,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440–746, Republic of Korea
    2. SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT, )Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440–746, Republic of Korea
    • School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440–746, Republic of Korea.
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  • Sung M. Cho

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440–746, Republic of Korea
    2. Advanced Materials and Process Research Center for IT, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440–746, Republic of Korea
    • School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon 440–746, Republic of Korea.
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Abstract

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A selective metal transfer (SMT) process is applied to organic light-emitting diode (OLED) metal electrodes. Multicolored OLED device fabrication is demonstrated using a vacuum-free, selective metal transfer process where an Al thin film (<100 nm) is transferred onto only the top of a light emitting layer containing polyvinyl carbazole. With this one-step process, it is possible to make separate, differently colored electrodes and to drive each independently. Scale-up of this process is relatively easy and SMT has a high potential in the industrial fabrication of metal electrodes for various organic electronics.

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