Printed Origami Structures (Adv. Mater. 20/2010)

Authors

  • Bok Yeop Ahn,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
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  • Daisuke Shoji,

    1. Pentax New Ceramics Division, Hoya Corporation Tokyo 174-8639 (Japan)
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  • Christopher J. Hansen,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
    2. Autonomic Materials Systems Group Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
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  • Eunji Hong,

    1. School of Advanced Materials Engineering Kookmin University Seoul 136-702 (Korea)
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  • David C. Dunand,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Northwestern University Evanston, IL 60208 (USA)
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  • Jennifer A. Lewis

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
    2. Autonomic Materials Systems Group Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (USA)
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, IL 61801 (USA).
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Abstract

original image

Bok Y. Ahn, Jennifer Lewis, and co-workers report on p. 2251 a new method for creating complex 3D structures that combines direct-write assembly with a wet-folding origami technique. Planar lattices composed of a titanium hydride ink are printed, and then folded, rolled, or molded into the desired shape. These 3D objects are then transformed into metallic or ceramic structures by thermal annealing.

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