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Advanced Materials

Graphene: Piecing it Together

Authors

  • Mark H. Rümmeli,

    Corresponding author
    1. Leibniz-Institut für Festkörper- und Werkstoffforschung, Dresden e. V., PF 27 01 16, 01171 Dresden, Germany and Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany
    • Leibniz-Institut für Festkörper- und Werkstoffforschung, Dresden e. V., PF 27 01 16, 01171 Dresden, Germany and Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany
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  • Claudia G. Rocha,

    1. Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany
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  • Frank Ortmann,

    1. INAC/SPrAM, CEA Grenoble, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble, France
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  • Imad Ibrahim,

    1. Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany and the Leibniz-Institut für Festkörper- und Werkstoffforschung, Dresden e. V., PF 27 01 16, 01171 Dresden, Germany
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  • Haldun Sevincli,

    1. Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany
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  • Felix Börrnert,

    1. Leibniz-Institut für Festkörper- und Werkstoffforschung, Dresden e. V., PF 27 01 16, 01171 Dresden, Germany
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  • Jens Kunstmann,

    1. Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany
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  • Alicja Bachmatiuk,

    1. Leibniz-Institut für Festkörper- und Werkstoffforschung, Dresden e. V., PF 27 01 16, 01171 Dresden, Germany
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  • Markus Pötschke,

    1. Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany
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  • Masashi Shiraishi,

    1. Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama-cho 1-3, Toyonaka-shi 560-8531, Osaka, Japan
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  • M. Meyyappan,

    1. Center for Nanotechnology, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, US, Division of IT Convergence Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784, Republic of Korea
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  • Bernd Büchner,

    1. Leibniz-Institut für Festkörper- und Werkstoffforschung, Dresden e. V., PF 27 01 16, 01171 Dresden, Germany
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  • Stephan Roche,

    1. CIN2 (ICN-CSIC) and Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Catalan Institute of Nanotechnology, Campus de la UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona), Spain & ICREA, Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, 08010 Barcelona, Spain and Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Dresden University of Technology, 01062 Dresden, Germany
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  • Gianaurelio Cuniberti

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden 01062, Germany and Division of IT Convergence Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784, Republic of Korea
    • Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden 01062, Germany and Division of IT Convergence Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784, Republic of Korea.
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Abstract

Graphene has a multitude of striking properties that make it an exceedingly attractive material for various applications, many of which will emerge over the next decade. However, one of the most promising applications lie in exploiting its peculiar electronic properties which are governed by its electrons obeying a linear dispersion relation. This leads to the observation of half integer quantum hall effect and the absence of localization. The latter is attractive for graphene-based field effect transistors. However, if graphene is to be the material for future electronics, then significant hurdles need to be surmounted, namely, it needs to be mass produced in an economically viable manner and be of high crystalline quality with no or virtually no defects or grains boundaries. Moreover, it will need to be processable with atomic precision. Hence, the future of graphene as a material for electronic based devices will depend heavily on our ability to piece graphene together as a single crystal and define its edges with atomic precision. In this progress report, the properties of graphene that make it so attractive as a material for electronics is introduced to the reader. The focus then centers on current synthesis strategies for graphene and their weaknesses in terms of electronics applications are highlighted.

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