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Advanced Materials

Intumescent All-Polymer Multilayer Nanocoating Capable of Extinguishing Flame on Fabric

Authors

  • Yu-Chin Li,

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A&M University, 3123 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, USA
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  • Sarah Mannen,

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A&M University, 3123 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, USA
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  • Alexander B. Morgan,

    1. Multiscale Composites and Polymers Division, University of Dayton Research Institute, 300 College Park, Dayton, OH 45469, USA
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  • SeChin Chang,

    1. Southern Regional Research Center (SRRC), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), 1100 Robert E. Lee Blvd. New Orleans, LA 70124, USA
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  • You-Hao Yang,

    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A&M University, 3123 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, USA
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  • Brian Condon,

    1. Southern Regional Research Center (SRRC), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), 1100 Robert E. Lee Blvd. New Orleans, LA 70124, USA
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  • Jaime C. Grunlan

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A&M University, 3123 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, USA
    • Department of Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A&M University, 3123 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, USA.
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Abstract

An intumescent nanocoating composed of poly(allylamine) and poly(sodium phosphate) is deposited layer-by-layer on cotton fabric. Fire is extinguished right after ignition on the fabric during vertical flame testing. The individual fibers are conformally coated and bubbles form on the fiber surfaces during burning, which is due to an intumescent effect.

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