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Stabilization of Proteins by Nanoencapsulation in Sugar–Glass for Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery Applications

Authors

  • Jyotsnendu Giri,

    1. Polymers Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899, USA
    2. National Institute of Arthritis, and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
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  • Wan-Ju Li,

    1. Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53705, USA
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  • Rocky S. Tuan,

    1. National Institute of Arthritis, and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
    2. Center for Cellular and Molecular Engineering, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15219, USA
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  • Marcus T. Cicerone

    Corresponding author
    1. Polymers Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899, USA
    • Polymers Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899, USA.

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Abstract

A novel sugar–glass-nanoparticle (SGnP) system is developed to stabilize biomolecules for incorporation and delivery from a drug delivery system. It yields excellent protection from process-related stresses with little or no degradation, very good encapsulation efficiency, and storage stability, as well as giving burst-free sustained release for essentially any protein and polymer system of interest.

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