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Advanced Materials

Nanomaterial Engineering and Property Studies in a Transmission Electron Microscope

Authors

  • Dmitri Golberg,

    Corresponding author
    1. Nanotube Unit, International Center for Materials, Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1–1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 3050044, Japan
    • Nanotube Unit, International Center for Materials, Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1–1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 3050044, Japan.
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  • Pedro M.F.J. Costa,

    1. CICECO, Department of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, University of Aveiro 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal) and IFW, Dresden Helmholtzstrasse 20 01069 Dresden, Germany
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  • Ming-Sheng Wang,

    1. Laboratory for Nanophotonics and Electronics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 Massachusetts, Avenue Cambridge, MA 02139, USA
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  • Xianlong Wei,

    1. Nanotube Unit, International Center for Materials, Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1–1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 3050044, Japan
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  • Dai-Ming Tang,

    1. Nanotube Unit, International Center for Materials, Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1–1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 3050044, Japan
    2. Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang, 110016, P.R. China
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  • Zhi Xu,

    1. Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100190, P.R. China
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  • Yang Huang,

    1. School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia
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  • Ujjal K. Gautam,

    1. New Chemistry Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research (JNCASR), Jakkur, Bangalore, 560064, India
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  • Baodan Liu,

    1. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024, P.R. China
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  • Haibo Zeng,

    1. Inorganic Nanostructures Unit, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) Namiki 1–1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 3050044, Japan
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  • Naoyki Kawamoto,

    1. Nanotube Unit, International Center for Materials, Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1–1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 3050044, Japan
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  • Chunyi Zhi,

    1. Inorganic Nanostructures Unit, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) Namiki 1–1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 3050044, Japan
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  • Masanori Mitome,

    1. Nanotube Unit, International Center for Materials, Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1–1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 3050044, Japan
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  • Yoshio Bando

    1. Inorganic Nanostructures Unit, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) Namiki 1–1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 3050044, Japan
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Abstract

Modern methods of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) allow one to not only manipulate with a nanoscale object at the nanometer-range precision but also to get deep insights into its physical and chemical statuses. Dedicated TEM holders combining the capabilities of a conventional high-resolution TEM instrument and atomic force -, and/or scanning tunneling microscopy probes become the powerful tools in nanomaterials analysis. This progress report highlights the past, present and future of these exciting methods based on the extensive authors endeavors over the last five years. The objects of interest are diverse. They include carbon, boron nitride and other inorganic one- and two-dimensional nanoscale materials, e.g., nanotubes, nanowires and nanosheets. The key point of all experiments discussed is that the mechanical and electrical transport data are acquired on an individual nanostructure level under ultimately high spatial, temporal and energy resolution achievable in TEM, and thus can directly be linked to morphological, structural and chemical peculiarities of a given nanomaterial.

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