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Advanced Materials

Role of Majority and Minority Carrier Barriers Silicon/Organic Hybrid Heterojunction Solar Cells

Authors

  • Sushobhan Avasthi,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    • Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA.
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  • Stephanie Lee,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
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  • Yueh-Lin Loo,

    1. Department of Chemical Engineering, Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
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  • James C. Sturm

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
    • Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA.
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Abstract

A hybrid approach to solar cells is demonstrated in which a silicon p–n junction, used in conventional silicon-based photovoltaics, is replaced by a room-temperature fabricated silicon/organic heterojunction. The unique advantage of silicon/organic heterojunction is that it exploits the cost advantage of organic semiconductors and the performance advantages of silicon to enable potentially low-cost, efficient solar cells.

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